Art Tutorials

Art Tutorial – Week 9

Art Tutorial – Week 9

Meet art educator Chad Hitchcock, better known as “Mr. H.,” a long-standing faculty member of the Brevard Public Schools System and an outstanding instructor in multiple summer art camp programs for the last nine years! This summer, he will be leading teens in our Art Inspirations 2020 Virtual Art Camp, as we explore the massive influence that the world around us plays in the creation of artworks. In this video, you will see him work on an “Earth selfie”- a watercolor self-portrait in which he explores the human connection to the planet.

Art Tutorial – Week 8

Art Tutorial – Week 8

Professional potter and Museum Art School instructor, Kent Johnson, gives us a simple tutorial to work on the most fundamental ceramic object: a pinch pot.

Art Tutorial – Week 7

Art Tutorial – Week 7

Pigment to water ratio in watercolor painting. Master watercolor artist and Museum Art School instructor, Joel Johnson, shows us some tricks and techniques on how to best control the water to pigment ratio

Art Tutorial – Week 6

Art Tutorial – Week 6

Watch portrait artist and Museum Art School instructor, Judy Burgarella as she works within the Chroma curve to bring life into her canvas.

Art Tutorial – Week 5

Art Tutorial – Week 5

Follow artist and Museum Art School instructor, Dawn Mill in a simple approach to keeping #quarantinelife colorful. 
Using the beneficial practice of journaling, Dawn helps us tune in with the simple beauty that surrounds us through the calming watercolor medium.

Art Tutorial – Week 4

Art Tutorial – Week 4

Let’s go back to the basics!
Inspired by Peter Blume’s Study for ‘South of Scranton,’ artist and A+ Art Manager, Dawn Miller explores the elements of art through the drawing of overlapping figures. All you need are ordinary household objects and a simple coloring medium, like crayons, to follow her lead.

Art Tutorial – Week 3

Art Tutorial – Week 3

VBMA faculty member and art historian Chris Fasolino gives us a brief introduction to Japanese wabi-sabi aesthetics, which find beauty precisely in the temporary and imperfect.